DIVERSITY in Mental Health

The National Collaboration for Youth Mental Health was the first mainstream organization to make our National Conferences diverse and unique in terms of having multicultural, multi-faith, and gender free speakers, presenters and performers. Our work on the intersection of diversity and mental health is courageous,  transparent and inclusive.

The National Collaboration for Youth Mental Health continues to highlight mental health challenges among diverse populations who experience systemic and overt racism.

On June 18, 2020, we will highlight Judge Stanley Grizzle, who wrote “My Names Not George” to demonstrate that systemic discrimination and racism can be overcome without compromising our values. Judge Stanley Grizzle’s resilience and determination in overcoming the racism which cause many black youth to experience repeated trauma, depression, anxiety, a sense of hopelessness, which can lead to lower test scores and academic performance makes him a role model for diverse groups and people who feel excluded, oppressed and limited by discrimination, which still greatly impacts our diverse student population. 

Justice, Mental Health and Diversity Ahmaud Arbery: The shooting of an unarmed 25-year-old black man

#runwithmaud

The shooting of an unarmed 25-year-old black man by a former cop and his son shocked and enraged the world. Stacey Abrams and Joe Biden called for “immediate charges and an unbiased prosecution”. 

Brunswick organized #runwithmaud on Arbery’s 25th birthday. A white 55-year-old man Roger Missie tweeted, “As a white man I didn’t have to worry about somebody pulling a gun on me. That’s privilege in America today. A human being is a human being. Skin tone doesn’t change that.” Rae Ann, a 25-year-old white woman tweeted “I thought about my privilege on my run today. Trying to use my voice for good in the world.”

What would the world be like if we as individuals and businesses came together and “tried to use our voice for good”? We have universal health care, but our justice system contains racial disparities. Our homelessness and mental health systems need systemic change, but our hearts and soul are in the right place. We believe in and embrace democracy. In business, let’s continue to “go high” – Are we inclusive? Is our staff diverse? Do we understand how we harm someone’s mental health when we exclude and discriminate? Do we engage with our colleagues professionally and justly?

Ready to Make a Change?